Top 
The best in patient care.
The latest in surgical innovation.

General Surgery

General surgery is a surgical specialty that focuses on the abdominal area, including the esophagus, stomach, small bowel, colon, liver, pancreas, gallbladder and bile ducts, as well as on diseases involving the skin, breast, soft tissue and hernias.

According to the American Board of Surgery, general surgery is a discipline that demands knowledge of and familiarity with a broad spectrum of diseases that may require surgical treatment. While the breadth and depth of this knowledge will vary by disease category, the general surgeon is expected to be competent in diagnosing and treating the full spectrum of disease.

The Khalili Center’s General Surgery Team are specialists in a wide range of minimally invasive procedures.

Laparoscopic Surgical Specialties

Laparoscopic

Hernia Repair

bariatric_gastric_header

Overview

The wall of the human abdomen has natural areas of potential weakness. Hernias can develop at these or other areas due to heavy strain on the abdominal wall, aging, injury, an old incision or a weakness present from birth. Anyone can develop a hernia at any age. Most hernias in children are congenital. In adults, a natural weakness or strain from heavy lifting, persistent coughing, and difficulty with bowel movements or urination can cause the abdominal wall to weaken or separate. The common areas where hernias occur are in the groin (inguinal), belly button (umbilical), and the site of a previous operation (incisional).

A hernia occurs when the inside layers of the abdominal muscle have weakened, resulting in a bulge or tear. In the same way that an inner tube pushes through a damaged tire, the inner lining of the abdomen pushes through the weakened area of the abdominal wall to form a small balloon-like sac. This can allow a loop of intestine or abdominal tissue to push into the sac. At times, a hernia can cause severe pain and other potentially serious problems that could require surgery.

Both men and women can get a hernia, and some may be born with a hernia (congenital) or develop one over time. A hernia does not get better over time, nor will it go away by itself.

It is usually easy to recognize a hernia. You may notice a bulge under the skin. You may feel pain when you lift heavy objects, cough, strain during urination or bowel movements, or during prolonged standing or sitting. The pain may be sharp and immediate or a dull ache that gets worse toward the end of the day. Severe, continuous pain, redness, and tenderness are signs that the hernia may be entrapped or strangulated. These symptoms are cause for concern and if you experience them, you should immediately contact your physician.

Laparoscopic Hernia Repair is a technique to fix tears in the abdominal wall (muscle) using small incisions, telescopes and a patch (mesh). It may offer a quicker return to work and normal activities with a decreased pain for some patients.

How To Prepare

Most hernia operations are performed on an outpatient basis, and therefore you will probably go home on the same day that the operation is performed. Preoperative preparation includes blood work, medical evaluation, chest x-ray and an EKG depending on your age and medical condition. If you have difficulties moving your bowels, an enema or similar preparation may be used after consulting with your surgeon.

  • After midnight the night before the operation, you should not eat or drink anything except medications that your surgeon has told you are permissible to take with a sip of water the morning of surgery.
  • Drugs such as aspirin, blood thinners, anti-inflammatory medications (arthritis medications) and Vitamin E will need to be stopped temporarily for several days to a week prior to surgery.
  • Diet medication or St. John’s Wort should not be used for the two weeks prior to surgery.
  • Quit smoking and arrange for any help you may need at home.

Results

Following the operation, you will be transferred to the recovery room where you will be monitored for 1-2 hours until you are fully awake. Once you are awake and able to walk, you will be sent home.

With any hernia operation, you can expect some soreness mostly during the first 24 to 48 hours. You are encouraged to be up and about the day after surgery.

With laparoscopic hernia repair, you will probably be able to get back to your normal activities within a short amount of time. These activities include showering, driving, walking up stairs, lifting, working and engaging in sexual intercourse.

What to Expect

Following the operation, you will be transferred to the recovery room where you will be monitored for 1-2 hours until you are fully awake. Once you are awake and able to walk, you will be sent home.

With any hernia operation, you can expect some soreness mostly during the first 24 to 48 hours. You are encouraged to be up and about the day after surgery.

With laparoscopic hernia repair, you will probably be able to get back to your normal activities within a short amount of time. These activities include showering, driving, walking up stairs, lifting, working and engaging in sexual intercourse.

Common advantages of having the surgical procedure performed laparoscopically are:

  • Less postoperative pain
  • May shorten hospital stay
  • May result in a faster return to solid-food diet
  • May result in a quicker return of bowel function
  • Quicker return to normal activity
  • Improved cosmetic results

Risks

Any operation may be associated with complications. The primary complications of any operation are bleeding and infection, which are uncommon with laparoscopic hernia repair. There is a slight risk of injury to the urinary bladder, the intestines, blood vessels, nerves or the sperm tube going to the testicle. Difficulty urinating after surgery is not unusual and may require a temporary tube into the urinary bladder for as long as one week.

Any time a hernia is repaired it can come back. This long-term recurrence rate is not yet known. Your surgeon will help you decide if the risks of laparoscopic hernia repair are less than the risks of leaving the condition untreated.

Be sure to call your physician or surgeon if you develop any of the following:

  • Persistent fever over 101 degrees F (39 C)
  • Bleeding
  • Increasing abdominal or groin swelling
  • Pain that is not relieved by your medications
  • Persistent nausea or vomiting
  • Inability to urinate
  • Chills
  • Persistent cough or shortness of breath
  • Purulent drainage (pus) from any location
  • Redness surrounding any of your incisions that is worsening or getting bigger
  • You are unable to eat or drink liquids

Questions? Click Here

Laparoscopic

Gallbladder Surgery

bariatric_gastric_header

Overview

The gallbladder is a pear-shaped organ that rests beneath the right side of the liver. Its main purpose is to collect and concentrate a digestive liquid (bile) produced by the liver. Bile is released from the gallbladder after eating, aiding digestion. Bile travels through narrow tubular channels (bile ducts) into the small intestine. Gallbladder surgery may be necessary when gallstones block the flow of bile out of the gallbladder, causing it to swell and resulting in sharp abdominal pain, vomiting, indigestion and, occasionally, fever. If the gallstone blocks the common bile duct, jaundice (a yellowing of the skin) can occur.

Gallstones are small hard masses consisting primarily of cholesterol and bile salts that form in the gallbladder or in the bile duct. It is uncertain why some people form gallstones, and there is no known means to prevent gallstones.

Ultrasound is most commonly used to locate gallstones, and in more complex cases, other X-ray tests may be used to evaluate gallbladder disease.

Gallstones do not go away on their own. Some can be temporarily managed with drugs or by making dietary adjustments, such as reducing fat intake. This treatment has a low, short-term success rate. Symptoms will eventually continue unless the gallbladder is removed.

Surgical removal of the gallbladder, Cholecystectomy, is the time honored and safest treatment of gallbladder disease. There are a number of advantages to performing Cholecystectomy Laparoscopically, including:

  • Rather than a five to seven inch incision, the operation requires only four small openings in the abdomen.
  • Patients usually have minimal post-operative pain.
  • Patients usually experience faster recovery than open gallbladder surgery patients.
  • Most patients go home within one day and enjoy a quicker return to normal activities.

A thorough medical evaluation by your personal physician, in consultation with a surgeon trained in laparoscopy, can determine if laparoscopic gallbladder removal is an appropriate procedure for you.

How To Prepare

In preparing for a Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy, each patient and surgeon is unique, and the following general preparation information may be adjusted by the surgeon. Always follow your surgeon’s guidelines.

  • Preoperative preparation includes blood work, medical evaluation, chest x-ray and an EKG depending on your age and medical condition.
  • After your surgeon reviews with you the potential risks and benefits of the operation, you will need to provide written consent for surgery.
  • Your surgeon may request that you completely empty your colon and cleanse your intestines prior to surgery. You may be requested to drink clear liquids, only, for one or several days prior to surgery.
  • After midnight the night before the operation, you should not eat or drink anything except medications that your surgeon has told you are permissible to take with a sip of water the morning of surgery.
  • Drugs such as aspirin, blood thinners, anti-inflammatory medications (arthritis medications) and Vitamin E will need to be stopped temporarily for several days to a week prior to surgery.
  • Quit smoking and arrange for any help you may need at home.

Results

Gallbladder removal is a major abdominal operation and a certain amount of postoperative pain occurs. Nausea and vomiting are not uncommon. Once liquids or a diet is tolerated, patients leave the hospital the same day or day following the laparoscopic gallbladder surgery.

Activity is dependent on how the patient feels. Walking is encouraged. Patients can remove the dressings and shower the day after the operation. Patients will probably be able to return to normal activities within a week’s time, including driving, walking up stairs, light lifting and working.

In general, recovery should be progressive, once the patient is at home.

The onset of fever, yellow skin or eyes, worsening abdominal pain, distention, persistent nausea or vomiting, or drainage from the incision are indications that a complication may have occurred. Your surgeon should be contacted in these instances.

Most patients who have a laparoscopic gallbladder removal go home from the hospital the day after surgery. Some may even go home the same day the operation is performed.

Most patients can return to work within seven days following the laparoscopic procedure depending on the nature of your job. Patients with administrative or desk jobs usually return in a few days while those involved in manual labor or heavy lifting may require a bit more time. Patients undergoing the open procedure usually resume normal activities in four to six weeks.

Risks

While there are risks associated with any kind of operation, the vast majority of laparoscopic gallbladder patients experiences few or no complications and quickly return to normal activities. It is important to remember that before undergoing any type of surgery–whether laparoscopic or open you should ask your surgeon about his/her training and experience.

Complications of laparoscopic cholecystectomy are infrequent, but include bleeding, infection, pneumonia, blood clots, or heart problems. Unintended injury to adjacent structures such as the common bile duct or small bowel may occur and may require another surgical procedure to repair it. Bile leakage into the abdomen from the tubular channels leading from the liver to the intestine may rarely occur.

Numerous medical studies show that the complication rate for laparoscopic gallbladder surgery is comparable to the complication rate for open gallbladder surgery when performed by a properly trained surgeon.

Questions? Click Here

Laparoscopic

Colon Resection

bariatric_gastric_header

Overview

The intestine is a long, tubular organ consisting of the small intestine, the colon (large intestine) and the rectum, which is the last part of the colon. After food is swallowed, it begins to be digested in the stomach and then empties into the small intestine, where the nutritional part of the food is absorbed. The remaining waste moves to the large intestine, referred to as the colon, and then moves to the rectum and is expelled from the body. The colon and rectum absorb water and hold the waste until you are ready to expel it.

Each year, more than 600,000 surgical procedures are performed in the United States to treat a number of colon diseases. Although surgery is not always a cure, it is often the best way to stop the spread of disease and alleviate pain and discomfort.

Most diseases of the colon are diagnosed with one of two tests: a colonoscopy or barium enema. A colonoscope is a soft, bendable tube about the thickness of the index finger which is inserted into the anus and then advanced through the entire large intestine. A barium enema is a special X-ray where a white “milk-shake fluid” is flushed into the rectum and by using mild pressure is pushed throughout the entire large intestine. These tests allow the surgeon to look inside of the colon. Sometimes a CT scan of the abdomen will be necessary. If surgery is necessary, prior to the surgery, other blood tests, electrocardiogram (EKG) or a chest x-ray might be required.

A technique known as minimally invasive laparoscopic colon surgery allows surgeons to perform many common colon procedures through small incisions. Depending on the type of procedure, patients may leave the hospital in a few days and return to normal activities more quickly than patients recovering from open surgery.

In most laparoscopic colon resections, surgeons operate through 4 or 5 small openings (each about a quarter inch) while watching an enlarged image of the patient’s internal organs on a television monitor. In some cases, one of the small openings may be lengthened to 2 or 3 inches if necessary.

Using a cannula (a narrow tube-like instrument), the surgeon enters the abdomen. A laparoscope (a tiny telescope connected to a video camera) is inserted through the cannula, giving the surgeon a magnified view of the patient’s internal organs on a television monitor. Several other cannulas are inserted to allow the surgeon to work inside and remove part of the colon. The entire procedure may be completed through the cannulas or by lengthening one of the small cannula incisions.

How To Prepare

Preoperative preparation includes blood work, medical evaluation, chest x-ray and an EKG depending on your age and medical condition. Blood transfusion and/or blood products may be needed during surgery depending on your condition, so be sure to discuss with your surgeon.

The rectum and colon must be completely empty before surgery. Usually, the patient must drink a special cleansing solution. You may be on several days of clear liquids, laxatives and enemas prior to the operation. Antibiotics by mouth are commonly prescribed. Your surgeon or his/her staff will give you instructions regarding the cleansing routine to be used. Follow your surgeon’s instructions carefully. If you are unable to take the preparation or the antibiotics, contact your surgeon. If you do not complete the preparation, it may be unsafe to undergo the surgery and it may have to be rescheduled.

  • After midnight the night before the operation, you should not eat or drink anything except medications that your surgeon has told you are permissible to take with a sip of water the morning of surgery.
  • Drugs such as aspirin, blood thinners, anti-inflammatory medications (arthritis medications) and Vitamin E will need to be stopped temporarily for several days to a week prior to surgery.
  • Quit smoking and arrange for any help you may need at home.

Results

Results will vary depending upon the type of procedure performed, the reason for surgery, and patient’s overall condition. Please ask your surgeon about the anticipated outcome of the surgery, and make sure all of your questions are answered prior to surgery. Surgeons are happy to discuss your individual case. Common advantages of having the surgical procedure performed laparoscopically are:

  • Less postoperative pain
  • May shorten hospital stay
  • May result in a faster return to solid-food diet
  • May result in a quicker return of bowel function
  • Quicker return to normal activity
  • Improved cosmetic results

What to Expect

After the operation, it is important to follow your doctor’s instructions. Although many people feel better in a few days, remember that your body needs time to heal. You are encouraged to be out of bed the day after surgery and to walk. This will help diminish the soreness in your muscles.

You will probably be able to get back to most of your normal activities in one to two weeks’ time. These activities include showering, driving, walking up stairs, working and engaging in sexual intercourse.

Risks

Complications of laparoscopic colon resection include:

  • Bleeding
  • Infection
  • A leak where the colon was connected back together
  • Injury to adjacent organs such as the small intestine, ureter, or bladder
  • Blood clots to the lungs

It is important for you to recognize the early signs of possible complications. Contact your surgeon if you notice severe abdominal pain, fevers, chills, or rectal bleeding.

Be sure to call your physician or surgeon if you develop any of the following:

  • Persistent fever over 101 degrees F (39 C)
  • Bleeding from the rectum
  • Increasing abdominal swelling
  • Pain that is not relieved by your medications
  • Persistent nausea or vomiting
  • Chills
  • Persistent cough or shortness of breath
  • Purulent drainage (pus) from any location
  • Redness surrounding any of your incisions that is worsening or getting bigger
  • You are unable to eat or drink liquids

Questions? Click Here

Laparoscopic

Stomach Surgery

bariatric_gastric_header

Overview

There are a variety of different types of diseases that can affect the stomach which include gastric tumors (both malignant and benign), peptic ulcers, and gastroparesis to name a few.

There is no one single cause of stomach cancer but there are a number of risk factors that have been identified. Consuming salted or smoked foods as well as foods containing nitrites can increase an individual’s risk for cancer. Likewise, stomach cancer is more common in people that smoke cigarettes and drink alcohol. An infection with a bacterium called Helicobacter Pylori can also increase the risk of gastric cancer by as much as 6 times. There are a variety of surgical treatment options for gastric tumors, many of which can be performed laparoscopically.

Peptic ulcers are ulcers that can occur either in the wall of the duodenum (common) or the stomach (less common). An ulcer is a break in the lining of the stomach that is deep enough to form a crater. The vast majority of duodenal ulcers are related to an infection with Helicobacter Pylori which can be treated effectively with medication. Ulcers that do not respond to medication, or cause problems like bleeding or obstruction, may require surgical intervention.

Gastroparesis is a condition in which the muscles in your stomach don’t function normally. Gastroparesis can develop as a result of a variety of causes including Diabetes Mellitus, anorexia nervosa, bulimia, scleroderma, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Parkinson’s disease, or from an injury to the Vagus nerve. There is currently no cure for gastroparesis, though making dietary changes can help you cope with some of the symptoms. The symptoms of gastroparesis can include chronic nausea, chronic diarrhea, vomiting, heartburn, bloating, abdominal pain, lack of appetite, and palpitations. These symptoms are cause for concern and if you experience them, you should immediately contact your physician.

How To Prepare

Most stomach operations require preoperative preparation which includes blood work, medical evaluation, chest x-ray and an EKG depending on your age and medical condition. If you have difficulties moving your bowels, an enema or similar preparation may be used after consulting with your surgeon.

  • You may be on several days of clear liquids, laxatives and enemas prior to the operation.
  • After midnight the night before the operation, you should not eat or drink anything except medications that your surgeon has told you are permissible to take with a sip of water the morning of surgery.
  • Drugs such as aspirin, blood thinners, anti-inflammatory medications (arthritis medications) and Vitamin E will need to be stopped temporarily for several days to a week prior to surgery.
  • Diet medication or St. John’s Wort should not be used for the two weeks prior to surgery.
  • Quit smoking and arrange for any help you may need at home.

Results

Results will vary depending upon the type of procedure performed, the reason for surgery, and patient’s overall condition. Please ask your surgeon about the anticipated outcome of the surgery, and make sure all of your questions are answered prior to surgery. Surgeons are happy to discuss your individual case. Common advantages of having the surgical procedure performed laparoscopically are:

  • Less postoperative pain
  • May shorten hospital stay
  • May result in a faster return to solid-food diet
  • May result in a quicker return of bowel function
  • Quicker return to normal activity
  • Improved cosmetic results

What to Expect

After the operation, it is important to follow your doctor’s instructions. Although many people feel better in a few days, remember that your body needs time to heal. You are encouraged to be out of bed the day after surgery and to walk. This will help diminish the soreness in your muscles.

You will probably be able to get back to most of your normal activities in one to two weeks’ time. These activities include showering, driving, walking up stairs, working and engaging in sexual intercourse.

Risks

Complications of laparoscopic colon resection include:

  • Bleeding
  • Infection
  • A leak where the colon was connected back together
  • Injury to adjacent organs such as the small intestine, ureter, or bladder
  • Blood clots to the lungs

It is important for you to recognize the early signs of possible complications. Contact your surgeon if you notice severe abdominal pain, fevers, chills, or rectal bleeding.

Be sure to call your physician or surgeon if you develop any of the following:

  • Persistent fever over 101 degrees F (39 C)
  • Bleeding
  • Increasing abdominal or groin swelling
  • Pain that is not relieved by your medications
  • Persistent nausea or vomiting
  • Inability to urinate
  • Chills
  • Persistent cough or shortness of breath
  • Purulent drainage (pus) from any location
  • Redness surrounding any of your incisions that is worsening or getting bigger
  • You are unable to eat or drink liquids

Questions? Click Here

Laparoscopic

Solid Organ Surgery

bariatric_gastric_header

Overview

Solid organ surgery includes surgery of the liver, spleen, adrenal glands, and kidneys. There are a variety of different types of diseases that can affect these organs. A portion, or all of a solid organ may be removed if the organ contains a tumor, is hyperactive, or not functioning properly. There are a variety of surgical treatment options for solid organ disease, many of which can be performed laparoscopically.

The liver can develop tumors, originating from the liver such as the case with hemangiomas and hepatocellular carcinoma, or as a metastatic lesion from another organ.

The adrenal glands are located above the kidney on both the right and left sides. These organs produce both hormones and neurotransmitters. Tumors of the adrenal glands can develop and cause an overproduction of various hormones such as adrenaline, aldosterone, and cortisone.

The spleen plays an important role in the maintenance of our blood and immune systems. The spleen filters your blood and traps things like damaged red blood cells, viruses, bacteria, and other debris that my cause an infection. The spleen is removed if it becomes enlarged, develops idiopathic thrombocytopenia, if it is injured, and during surgery for stomach cancer.

How To Prepare

Most stomach operations require preoperative preparation which includes blood work, medical evaluation, chest x-ray and an EKG depending on your age and medical condition. If you have difficulties moving your bowels, an enema or similar preparation may be used after consulting with your surgeon.

  • You may be on several days of clear liquids, laxatives and enemas prior to the operation.
  • After midnight the night before the operation, you should not eat or drink anything except medications that your surgeon has told you are permissible to take with a sip of water the morning of surgery.
  • Drugs such as aspirin, blood thinners, anti-inflammatory medications (arthritis medications) and Vitamin E will need to be stopped temporarily for several days to a week prior to surgery.
  • Diet medication or St. John’s Wort should not be used for the two weeks prior to surgery.
  • Quit smoking and arrange for any help you may need at home.

Results

Results will vary depending upon the type of procedure performed, the reason for surgery, and patient’s overall condition. Please ask your surgeon about the anticipated outcome of the surgery, and make sure all of your questions are answered prior to surgery. Surgeons are happy to discuss your individual case. Common advantages of having the surgical procedure performed laparoscopically are:

  • Less postoperative pain
  • May shorten hospital stay
  • May result in a faster return to solid-food diet
  • May result in a quicker return of bowel function
  • Quicker return to normal activity
  • Improved cosmetic results

What to Expect

After the operation, it is important to follow your doctor’s instructions. Although many people feel better in a few days, remember that your body needs time to heal. You are encouraged to be out of bed the day after surgery and to walk. This will help diminish the soreness in your muscles.

You will probably be able to get back to most of your normal activities in one to two weeks’ time. These activities include showering, driving, walking up stairs, working and engaging in sexual intercourse.

Risks

Complications of laparoscopic colon resection include:

  • Bleeding
  • Infection
  • Changes in levels of hormones or neurotransmitters that were produced by the removed organ
  • Injury to adjacent organs such as the small intestine, ureter, or bladder
  • Blood clots to the lungs

It is important for you to recognize the early signs of possible complications. Contact your surgeon if you notice severe abdominal pain, fevers, chills, or rectal bleeding.

Be sure to call your physician or surgeon if you develop any of the following:

  • Persistent fever over 101 degrees F (39 C)
  • Bleeding
  • Increasing abdominal or groin swelling
  • Pain that is not relieved by your medications
  • Persistent nausea or vomiting
  • Inability to urinate
  • Chills
  • Persistent cough or shortness of breath
  • Purulent drainage (pus) from any location
  • Redness surrounding any of your incisions that is worsening or getting bigger
  • You are unable to eat or drink liquids

Questions? Click Here

Laparoscopic

Reflux Surgery

bariatric_gastric_header

Overview

Although “heartburn” is often used to describe a variety of digestive problems, in medical terms, it is actually a symptom of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). In this condition, stomach acids reflux or “back up” from the stomach into the esophagus. Heartburn is described as a harsh, burning sensation in the area in between your ribs or just below your neck. The feeling may radiate through the chest and into the throat and neck. Many adults in the United States experience this uncomfortable, burning sensation at least once a month. Other symptoms may also include vomiting, difficulty swallowing and chronic coughing or wheezing.

Patients who do not respond well to lifestyle changes or medications or those who continually require medications to control their symptoms, will either have to learn to live with their condition, or, if found to be a candidate* undergo a surgical procedure that is very effective in treating GERD, Laparoscopic Anti-Reflux Surgery.

Laparoscopic anti-reflux surgery (commonly referred to as Laparoscopic Nissen Fundoplication) involves reinforcing the “valve” between the esophagus and the stomach by wrapping the upper portion of the stomach around the lowest portion of the esophagus – much the way a bun wraps around a hot dog.

In a laparoscopic procedure, surgeons use small incisions (1/4 to 1/2 inch) to enter the abdomen through cannulas (narrow tube-like instruments). The laparoscope, which is connected to a tiny video camera, is inserted through the small incision, giving the surgeon a magnified view of the patient’s internal organs on a television screen.

The entire operation is performed “inside” after the abdomen is expanded by inflating gas into it.

* Although laparoscopic anti-reflux surgery has many benefits, it may not be appropriate for some patients. Obtain a thorough medical evaluation by a surgeon qualified in laparoscopic anti-reflux surgery in consultation with your primary care physician or Gastroenterologist to find out if the technique is appropriate for you.

How To Prepare

Preoperative preparation includes blood work, medical evaluation, chest x-ray and an EKG depending on your age and medical condition. Your surgeon may request that you completely empty your colon and cleanse your intestines prior to surgery. You may be requested to drink clear liquids, only, for one or several days prior to surgery.

  • After midnight the night before the operation, you should not eat or drink anything except medications that your surgeon has told you are permissible to take with a sip of water the morning of surgery.
  • Drugs such as aspirin, blood thinners, anti-inflammatory medications (arthritis medications) and Vitamin E will need to be stopped temporarily for several days to a week prior to surgery.
  • Quit smoking and arrange for any help you may need at home.

Results

Studies have shown that the vast majority of patients who undergo the procedure are either symptom-free or have significant improvement in their GERD symptoms.

What to Expect

After the operation, it is important to follow your doctor’s instructions. Although many people feel better in a few days, remember that your body needs time to heal. You are encouraged to be out of bed the day after surgery and to walk. This will help diminish the soreness in your muscles.

You will probably be able to get back to most of your normal activities in one to two weeks’ time. These activities include showering, driving, walking up stairs, working and engaging in sexual intercourse.

Risks

Although the operation is considered safe, complications may occur as they may occur with any operation. Complications may include but are not limited to:

  • Adverse reaction to general anesthesia
  • Bleeding
  • Injury to the esophagus, spleen, stomach or internal organs
  • Infection of the wound, abdomen, or blood
  • Other less common complications may also occur, and your surgeon may wish to discuss these with you

Be sure to call your physician or surgeon if you develop any of the following:

  • Persistent fever over 101 degrees F (39 C)
  • Bleeding from the rectum
  • Increasing abdominal swelling
  • Pain that is not relieved by your medications
  • Persistent nausea or vomiting
  • Chills
  • Persistent cough or shortness of breath
  • Purulent drainage (pus) from any location
  • Redness surrounding any of your incisions that is worsening or getting bigger
  • You are unable to eat or drink liquids

Questions? Click Here