29
Aug
14

Mediterranean Boneless Pork Chops

Mediteranean-Pork-Chop-Dinner

 

We love this delicious and so low calorie way to do pork chops! Mediterranean is all the rage and this high protein, colorful version makes this recipe a perfect bariatric choice! Enjoy a healthy lifestyle!

GATHER:
16 oz (8) thin sliced center cut boneless pork chops
3/4 tsp of McCormick Montreal Chicken Seasoning (25% Less Sodium)
1 small (6 oz) zucchini, ends trimmed off
1 small (6 oz) yellow squash, ends trimmed off
1 cup halved grape tomatoes
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
¼ tsp kosher salt and fresh cracked pepper
¼ teaspoon oregano
3 garlic cloves, sliced thin
Cooking spray
1/4 cup of pitted and sliced Kalamata olives
1/4 cup of crumbled Feta cheese
Fresh juice from 1/2 large lemon
1 tsp grated Lemon rind

MAKE:
*Preheat oven to 450 degrees. Season the pork chops with Montreal seasoning (or any seasoned salt you like).
*To Julienne the Zucchini and Yellow Squash: Use a mandolin fitted with a julienne blade, or slice the zucchini into 1/8-inch thick slices. Cut the slices lengthwise into 1/8-inch thick strips.
*Toss the tomatoes with 1/2 tbsp of the olive oil, 1/8 tsp salt, pepper, and oregano. Place tomatoes, cut side up, on a baking sheet lightly sprayed with cooking spray; roast for 10 minutes. Add sliced garlic and roast for another 5 minutes (this will prevent the garlic from burning). Transfer to a large work bowl and set aside. Reduce oven to 200°F.
*Heat a large non-stick skillet over medium-high heat, add remaining 1/2 tablespoon of olive oil and zucchini with 1/8 tsp salt and sauté until tender, about 5 minutes. Add to bowl with tomatoes and place in the warm oven.
*Working in two batches, spray the skillet with cooking spray and cook half of the the pork chops on medium-high heat for about 1 1/2 to 2 minutes on each side. The pork chops are thin so you don’t want to over cook them or they will be tough. Set aside on a platter.
*Remove the vegetables from the oven toss with Kalamata olives, juice of lemon and lemon rind. Serve the vegetables over the pork chops and top with Feta cheese.

EAT:
Servings: 4, Size: 2 chops, 3/4 cups veggies
Calories: 230
Protein: 28 grams
Carb: 9 grams
Fat: 9 grams

This recipe is from SkinnyTaste

 


28
Aug
14

Bariatric surgery causes remission of food addiction

They reported that remission of food addiction in 13 of the 14 subjects (93%) and no new cases were identified after surgery

Bariatric surgery-induced weight loss induces remission of food addiction and improves several eating behaviours that are associated with the condition in extreme obesity, according to the study published in the journal Obesity.

Although, bariatric surgery is believed to be one most effective available weight loss therapy for obesity and impacts on patients desire to eat, it is not known whether it can affect food addiction in patients who meet diagnostic criteria for the condition before surgery.

Therefore, researchers from the Center for Human Nutrition and Atkins Center of Excellence in Obesity Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, assessed whether weight loss induced gastric bypass, gastric banding and sleeve gastrectomy induced remission of food addiction, as well as normalising eating behaviours associated with the condition.

They recruited 44 obese patients (39 women, mean BMI48 ± 8) before and after bariatric surgery (after they lost ∼20% of their body weight). Twenty five patients had gastric bypass, 11 gastric banding and eight sleeve gastrectomy).

Food addiction was identified in 14 of 44 subjects (32%) before surgery, with no significant differences in factors that could affect the condition such as age, race, level of formal education, and income level.

They reported that remission of food addiction in 13 of the 14 subjects (93%) and no new cases were identified after surgery. The prevalence of food addiction in this study population decreased from 32% to 2% (p< 0.00001) and reduced the median number of symptoms in all subjects (p< 0.0001).

Surgery was found to decrease food cravings in both groups, but the decrease was greater in patients addicted to food. Unsurprisingly, the addicted patients craved foods more frequently before, but not after surgery. Interestingly, surgery decreased cravings for all types of foods but cravings for starchy foods were still more frequent in in the food addicted group (p=0.009).

“Our findings demonstrate that weight loss can induce remission of food addiction, even though subjects are still obese,” the authors write. “These data suggest that obesity itself does not cause food addiction, but that food addiction is a contributing, but modifiable, risk factor for obesity. Additional studies are needed to determine the mechanism(s) responsible for food addiction remission, and to determine whether the presence of food addiction influences the weight loss efficacy of bariatric surgery.”

This article was originally published by BariatricNews


26
Aug
14

REDUCE SUGAR!

Did you know that the average American consumes 3 pounds of sugar each week? That’s 6 cups!

What are the main culprits in today’s fast paced lifestyle?
• Soda
• Candy
• Cakes, cookies and pies
• Fruit drinks
• Milk desserts like ice cream and shakes

How to make a change:

• Drink water, water with added fruit slices, unsweetened teas and unsweetened beverages instead of sodas and other sweet beverages. Water increases your energy and does not add to your waistline!
• Place a fruit bowl in your home and at work. The added fiber can help minimize sugar cravings.
• Snack on foods that contain protein, like hard cooked eggs or string cheese instead of sugar. When you stabilize your blood sugar you crave less sweets and your mood improves!
• If it’s late and you are craving something sweet, reach for a fresh or frozen fruit in place of unhealthy desserts.

Go to Khalili Center for Bariatric Care for more great information


25
Aug
14

Obesity increases risk of 10 common cancers, study finds

More than 12,000 new cases of cancer every year can be attributed to the patient being overweight or obese, the biggest ever study of the links between body mass index and cancer has revealed.

Overweight and obesity was closely linked to 10 common cancers, researchers said. Every five-point increase in BMI – equivalent to an increase in weight of around 17.5kg – was associated with a 62 per cent higher risk of cancer of the uterus, a 31 per cent increased risk of gallbladder cancer and a 25 per cent increased risk of cancer of the kidney.

Having a higher BMI was also linked with a greater overall risk of liver, colon, ovarian and breast cancer, the study by experts at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) and the Farr Institute found.

While it has been known for some time that higher weight increases the chances of contracting certain cancers, risk levels have never been determined in such detail before. The study, which is published in The Lancet medical journal today, analysed the GP records of more than five million patients in the UK.

The researchers estimated that, if current trends in overweight and obesity rates continue, then by the mid 2020s there could be more than 3,500 additional cases of cancer every year.

“The number of people who are overweight or obese is rapidly increasing both in the UK and worldwide,” said study leader Dr Krishnan Bhaskaran, of LSHTM. “It is well recognised that this is likely to cause more diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Our results show that if these trends continue, we can also expect to see substantially more cancers as a result.”

Excess weight may account for as many as 41 per cent of uterine cancer cases, and 10 per cent of cancers of the gallbladder, kidney, liver and colon.

The study also found some evidence that, for prostate cancer and for breast cancer in young women, a higher BMI actually reduced the risk.

Precisely how fat could impact upon cancer risk is not fully understood. Dr Bhaskaran said that the variation in its impact across different forms of cancer said it must be affecting risk “through a number of different processes, depending on the cancer type”.

Tom Stansfeld, health information officer at Cancer Research UK, said: “This study of over five million people has found new and stronger links between obesity and several different cancer types, highlighting the number of cancers that obesity causes in the UK.

“Although the relationship between cancer and obesity is complex, it’s clear that carrying excess weight increases your risk of developing cancer. Keeping a healthy weight reduces cancer risk, and the best way to do this is through eating a healthy, balanced diet and exercising regularly.”

 

This information was originally published by The Independent UK which includes an informational video on the site.


24
Aug
14

Will You Be Obese? Look at Your Sisters, Brothers

Study found older sibling’s obesity was strongest predictor for risk

Obesity is known to run in families, but new research suggests this relationship may be the strongest among siblings.

Although older children in a two-child home with an obese parent are more than twice as likely to be obese, having an obese older sibling may raise the risk more than fivefold for a younger child, whether the parents are obese or not, the researchers reported.

“Siblings have a lot of influence,” said lead researcher Matthew Harding, an assistant professor in the Sanford School of Public Policy at Duke University in Durham, N.C.

“Children often model their behavior on that of their older siblings. Older siblings can have a strong influence on the attitudes and behaviors of younger siblings in relation to nutrition and exercise,” Harding noted.

Although parents play a big role in determining their children’s health, siblings may play an even greater role, he added.

For example, if the siblings are of the same sex, a boy with an obese older brother is 11 times more likely to be obese, Harding said.

“We need to recognize that children form strong bonds with their siblings, and when designing prevention or treatment of conditions such as obesity, we need to think carefully about the ties between siblings,” he said.

While the findings pointed to an association between obesity risk and siblings, they did not prove a cause-and-effect link between the two.

The report was published online July 8 and will appear in the October print issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Dr. David Katz, director of the Yale University Prevention Research Center, was not involved with study but is familiar with the findings. He said, “My reaction to this study is partly as an obesity expert, but largely as a parent. My wife and I have five children, so I have firsthand knowledge of sibling interaction.”

Families share behaviors, values and dietary patterns, he said. “To some extent, this is a study showing that kids exposed to a set of familial patterns and priorities that protect against obesity will be less vulnerable and, of course, vice versa,” he added.

It’s also likely that siblings directly influence one another with regard to diet and activities. “Every parent of more than one child has seen this,” Katz said.

For the study, Harding’s team collected data on over 10,000 American households and found that childhood obesity risk varies with the number of children and their sex.

Specifically, the researchers found that in a single-child home where a parent is obese, the child is 2.2 times more likely to be obese. In families with two children, however, they found an even stronger link between siblings.

The study also found a link between gender and obesity risk. In homes with one child, girls were less likely to be obese than boys.

In homes with two children, Harding’s group found that younger kids are influenced by older siblings, especially if they’re same gender.

The youngest boy in a two-child home is 11.4 times more likely to be obese if the older brother is, they noted. If the older child is a girl, the boy is 6.6 times more likely to be obese.

If the youngest child is a girl, she is 8.6 times more likely to be obese if she has an obese older sister. But if she has an obese older brother she is not significantly more likely to be obese, the researchers found.

Exercise and how much the kids eat both play a key role in the prevention of obesity. Harding’s team found that an only child was less likely to be physically active and more likely to eat fast food than those who had brothers and sisters.

This information was originally published by Consumer Healthday

For more information about bariatric care, visit the Khalili Center


22
Aug
14

Zesty Lime Shrimp and Avocado Salad

zesty-lime-shrimp-avocado-salad-2-up

We love this delicious bariatric friendly recipe because it is high in protein and super satisfying! The zesty lime juice, cilantro, avocados, tomatoes, and red onion complement the jumbo shrimp exciting your palate and easing your bariatric digestion. Enjoy!

GATHER:

1 lb jumbo cooked shrimp, peeled and deveined, chopped*
1 medium tomato, diced
1 hass avocado, diced
1 jalapeno, seeds removed, diced fine
1/4 cup chopped red onion
2 limes, juice of
1 tsp olive oil
1 tbsp chopped cilantro
salt and fresh pepper to taste

MAKE:

*In a small bowl combine red onion, lime juice, olive oil, pinch of salt and pepper. Let them marinate at least 5 minutes to mellow the flavor of the onion.
*In a large bowl combine chopped shrimp, avocado, tomato, jalapeño. Combine all the ingredients together, add cilantro and gently toss. Adjust salt and pepper to taste.

EAT:

Makes 3 1/2 cups

Servings: 4, Serving Size: 7/8 cup
Calories: 210.4
Protein: 25.1 grams
Carb: 7.8 grams
Fat: 9.2 grams


19
Aug
14

40 Percent of Americans Will Develop Diabetes, CDC Projects

Approximately two out of every five Americans will develop type 2 diabetes at some point during their adult lives, according to new U.S. government estimates.

The ongoing diabetes and obesity epidemics have combined with ever-increasing human lifespans to increase lifetime risk of type 2 diabetes to about 40 percent for both men and women, said lead study author Edward Gregg, chief of the epidemiology and statistics branch in the division of diabetes translation at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

“We weren’t necessarily surprised that it increased, but we didn’t expect it to increase this much,” Gregg said. “Forty percent is a humbling number.”

The odds are even worse for certain minority groups. Half of black women and Hispanic men and women are predicted to develop type 2 diabetes during their lifetime, the researchers reported.

Results of the study were published online Aug. 13 in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology.

Although the study didn’t separate diabetes by type, the vast majority of people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. In type 2 diabetes, the body either doesn’t produce enough insulin and/or is resistant to the effects of insulin, a hormone needed to use the sugars from foods to fuel the cells in the body and brain.

Obesity is a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes, but it’s not the only one. Genes also appear to play a role in the development of type 2 diabetes.

In the current study, researchers evaluated medical information and death certificates for about 600,000 adults between 1985 and 2011, to estimate trends in lifetime risk of diabetes as well as years of life lost to diabetes.

During the quarter-century studied, lifetime risk of type 2 diabetes increased for the average 20-year-old American man, jumping from nearly 21 percent in the late 1980s to just over 40 percent in 2011.

For an average 20-year-old woman, the risk increased from 27 percent in the 1980s to almost 40 percent, the investigators found.

The “diabesity” epidemic is the main driver of these increased risks, said Dr. Minisha Sood, an endocrinologist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City.

Doctors have coined the term “diabesity” to reflect the combined effects of the diabetes and obesity epidemics. “They go hand-in hand,” she said.

People also are living longer, which makes them more likely to develop diabetes at some point during their lives given the lack of exercise and eating habits of the average American, Gregg and Sood said.

Not all the news from the study was bad — the researchers found that people with type 2 diabetes are living longer than in the past. The CDC researchers estimated that the number of years lost to a diabetes patient diagnosed at age 40 decreased from nearly 8 years in the 1990s to about 6 years in the 2000s for men, and from almost 9 years to just under 7 years for women.

People with type 2 diabetes are living longer due to better medications and treatments for both the disease and its complications, which range from loss of vision and nerve damage to kidney failure and heart disease, Gregg said.

“Even after people develop complications of diabetes that used to increase risk of death, there are so many ways to keep people alive longer these days,” he said.

The impact on society will be immense as more Americans end up living longer with diabetes, Sood predicts.

“It’s rending people incapable of enjoying a good quality of life. It’s raising health care costs at an alarming rate. And frankly, there aren’t enough health care professionals to deal with what’s coming down the pike,” Sood said. “We’re looking at clogging up a health care system that’s already stretched to its limits.”
But Gregg suggested that this gloomy picture can change with effective efforts to combat obesity and diabetes. “If prevention efforts take hold, then the equation for lifetime risk will change pretty quickly,” he said.

But quick-fix solutions such as weight-loss surgery won’t cut it, he added.

“The thing that’s going to have the biggest effect is if people with multiple risk factors can make sustained changes in their lifestyles,” Gregg said. “Weight-loss surgery is an option for some and it is highly effective, but that’s not going to be the solution for the large number of people at risk for diabetes.”

Doctors, public health officials and other health care advocates need to figure out better ways to guide busy Americans to a healthier way of living, Sood said. That includes taking time to exercise nearly every day, eat right, and get good sleep.

 

This article was originally publshed by Us Health News


19
Aug
14

GET YOU AND YOUR FAMILY HEALTHY!

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As a weight loss surgery patient you are devoted to a healthy new lifestyle…what a drag if your family is not on board!

Try these healthy tips for success:

1. Put fruit on the counter visible to the eye. Automatic fast snacks!

2. Put veggie snacks like carrot sticks and fruit snacks into school or work lunches, tote bags carried on the weekend and make sure every meal has some form of vegetable. Who doesn’t want an apple or an orange when hunger strikes?!

3. Take your family to the local farmers market on the weekend and fill a basket with healthy new food choices. Walk, be outside and have fun getting healthy!

4. Recruit your family’s involvement in the food preparation. Those that cook together, get more excited about the healthy choices!

5. Dine at a table at least 3 times per week with your family. This demonstrates healthy habits to last a lifetime. But be sure to turn off the TV!

 


18
Aug
14

Obese women turning to bariatric surgery to boost fertility

Amanda Tyacke is finally pregnant, something she never thought she’d be.

“We had been told it probably would never happen,” she said.

Amanda hasn’t always been healthy. Most of her life she was severely overweight, weighing more than 300 pounds. She had fertility issues and was told losing weight may help her, so she took action.

“I made the big decision of doing bariatric surgery, at the time in hopes of getting pregnant,” she said.

About six years ago Amanda had a gastric band placed around the upper part of her stomach so that she would feel full with less food. She lost 100 pounds, then last may she switched to a gastric bypass, and lost another 45 pounds.

She had given up on having a baby when something shocking happened. During an ultrasound checking for a hernia, she was told she was pregnant.

“I’m like no I’m not, I said I can’t, I can’t get pregnant.” But it was true.

Amanda and her husband are thrilled and believe her weight loss is what did the trick.

Amanda’s bariatric surgeon, who is also her boss, says she is not alone. Dr. Michael Snyder says there are 19 patients in his practice right now who had bariatric surgery and are now pregnant.

“Clearly we don’t encourage this as a way to get pregnant, but some of our biggest referral sources are fertility doctors,” said Dr. Snyder.

Dr. Susan Trout is one of those doctors. She says many times larger women don’t ovulate and have a hard time getting pregnant. Some even develop polycystic ovarian syndrome.

“If you can reverse that and get them to thin down and get rid of some of the body fat, it often times reverses infertility too,” Dr. Trout said.

But can a woman who is eating less due to bariatric surgery support a growing fetus?

“It’s definitely manageable,” Dr. Trout said.

It’s been manageable for Amanda. Doctors will follow her closely. But now she has to mentally adjust to gaining weight, instead of losing it.

This article was originally published by Fox


15
Aug
14

Chicken Ropa Vieja

Chicken-Ropa-Vieja

This Bariatric Friendly Cuban inspired dish is made with shredded chicken breast cooked in the crock pot, then sauteed with bell peppers, onions, cumin and lots of Latin flavor!

GATHER:

For the Slow Cooker:

3 (22.5 oz) skinless boneless chicken breasts (or skinless thighs)
1 small onion, quartered
1 tomato, quartered
1 carrot, peeled and chopped
2 cloves garlic, peeled
2 bay leaves
kosher salt

To finish:

1 tbsp olive oil
2 cloves garlic
1 small onion, sliced long
1 small green bell pepper, seeded and thinly sliced
1 small red bell pepper, seeded and thinly sliced
1/4 cup dry white wine (or chicken broth)
1/2 cup tomato sauce
1 tsp cumin
1/4 tsp garlic powder
1/2 tsp kosher salt, plus more to taste
black pepper to taste

MAKE:

*Place chicken, 1 onion, tomato, carrot, and 2 cloves of garlic into crock pot. Add just enough water to cover, add bay leaves and salt and cook high for 4 hours until the chicken is tender. When done, remove chicken and shred with two forks; set aside. Reserve the broth.
*In a large deep skillet, heat the olive oil over medium heat. Add the remaining garlic, onions, green peppers, and red peppers. Cook about 3 to 4 minutes, or until soft. Stir in the cooked chicken, tomato sauce, white wine, and about 3/4 cup of the reserved broth to create a sauce. Season with cumin, garlic powder, salt, and pepper.
*Cover and simmer on low for about 8 to 10 minutes, adding more broth and seasoning if needed.

EAT:
Servings: 6, Size: 2/3 cup
Calories: 184.5
Protein: 24.5 grams
Carb: 6 grams
Fat: 6 grams

This recipe originally appeared in Skinny Taste


The information presented in the blog pages of Khalili Center is for educational and informational purposes only and should not considered personal medical advice. Consult with your personal physician/care giver regarding your own personal medical care.